Terrace restaurant paris

The most spacious terrace of Paris alone is worth a visit. It is perfectly arranged, friendly, chic and intimate.

The cosy terrace is designed to obscure Parisian life and the bustle of Place Jacques Rouche. There is no noise, no wind, no exhausts.

It is surrounded by large planters with boxwood balls and pittosporums that form little elegant cocoons, which provide a quiet and safe place to share a good time with those around you.

The heated terrace and sound system allow people to relax with music and escape the stress of the city.

Away from the bustle of Paris, the terrace of L'Opera Restaurant, is more than a food court, it's a real place of living.

If the terrace is ideal for a day-to-day taste of the delicious dishes of chef Stéphane Bidi, it turns on Fridays and Saturdays into a summer terrace for parties with a stylish and chic clientele.

This unique and coveted terrace located in a historic location literally became "the place to be" as soon as the first rays of the sun struck the tip of their noses. It provides the opportunity to savour the sweetness and warmth of summer with great ease and sophistication.

The terraces of the Palais Garnier are particularly well described by the architect himself, in his book The New Opera, published between 1878 and 1881, Charles Garnier devotes an entire chapter on the edge and outer railings of the building.
 
He describes both the strong constraints imposed by the terrain and the solutions he used:
"I put all these statues, all these columns and I opened all the doors to try to disguise as much as possible untoward levelling of the area around the Opera."

"The Opera House, uncomfortably seated on a hillside, erred on its base I wanted to straighten the view through my orthopaedic railing, and I only managed to disguise a very bad defect, which would probably have been accepted more easily if I left it just apparent."

He also explains his desire to repeat elements, including columns, pilasters and candelabra:
"As long as these have the same destination and contribute to the same goal, there is no argument in favour of diversity, rather, this sequence is better than any variety, and give an aspect of grandeur and simplicity."

Dissatisfied by the surroundings, Charles Garnier describes the solution:
"What to do about this now?
Nothing, or very little; enjoy the piercing of the Avenue de l'Opera to redesign some levels and lower few inches of the boulevard des Capucines.
It would not be an evil; but would not it still be a very great good, and I believe that the most effective way would be to put some planting shrubs at the monument. This would cut the lines and disguise the unfortunate slopes. Besides the green trees and flowers were invented, I think, to correct any defects in architecture, and it is rare that a bad house does not take a certain charm when it is accompanied by vegetation. You'll see later, when the opera is ruined and will be covered with ivy, you will see (to put it mildly) it will be large, picturesque, imposing and almost wonderful! Well, not immediately demolish the building, you could already give this generous companion stones, this friend of architecture, and planted here and there, a few evergreen trees, which would be worth more as a framework than closing unbalanced that which exists now."
 
The terrace of the restaurant is inspired by the specifications of the architect, and utilizes the repetition of elements without trying to erase the slope on which plants are used for rounding the lines.

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